Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Newbie Tuesday: Creating a facial toner (part four) - adding cosmeceuticals

Yesterday we took a look at cosmeceuticals and a few that we could incorporate into our toners. Today we'll create a few recipes you can try at home!

Let's say you liked this simple toner for dry skin with rose water and cucumber, what could we add to this mix?

Quick note: This toner is great for all skin types, not just people with dry skin! If you have oily skin, considering switching the cucumber extract for something like rosemary or grapeseed extract, if you want, or not. It's up to you! 

SIMPLE ROSE WATER & CUCUMBER TONER FOR DRY SKIN
HEATED WATER PHASE
69% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
5% witch hazel
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin

COOL DOWN PHASE
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

We have some allantoin in the mix, what else could benefit dry skin? I'd like to use a hydrolyzed protein like oat or silk or something similar to film form. (I've noticed seaweed extract is getting popular but I find it smells a bit fishy to me, so I haven't used it much. I find sea kelp or bull kelp extract is very good, and it doesn't have that fishy smell. A slight brininess as if I'm by the seaside, and I love that!) Let's use that in place for a hydrolyzed protein here.

Let's try adding 4% niacinamide and 2% n-acetyl glucosamine to this recipe, too. I like the idea of reducing pigmentation and evening out our skin tone while increasing hydration to our skin. This is a great idea for dry skin!

A quick aside: SlowLoris brought to my attention a study that indicates that 2% n-acetyl glucosamine and 4% niacinamide is effective. I did a bit more reading, and found all kinds of links to back that up. Thank you, SlowLoris, for correcting me! 

Here are a few resources to check out for more information on using these ingredients together...
Proctor & Gamble 
Proctor & Gamble again, but there aren't any percentages given. 
Medscape 
PubMed

Important aside: If you add something to a recipe, you remove the same amount from the distilled water amount to keep the recipe totalling 100%. In this case, every ingredient we add will come out of the 69% we've allotted for distilled water in the recipe above. (Click here for more information!) You'll notice we have added 9% to this recipe - 3% sea kelp, 2% niacinamide, 4% n-acetyl glucosamine - so we have to remove 9% of the distilled water amount, leaving us with 60% distilled water.

NOT SO SIMPLE TONER FOR DRY SKIN - ROSE WATER & CUCUMBER SEA KELP, NIACINAMIDE, AND NAG
HEATED WATER PHASE
60% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
5% witch hazel
3% sea kelp/bull kelp extract
4% niacinamide
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% n-acetyl glucosamine
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

Heat the heated water phase to about 60˚C in a double boiler to make sure all the powders dissolve, then remove from the heat and add the cool down phase at 45˚C or slightly lower. I generally put my powders into a small shot glass, then mix until they've dissolved before adding to the bigger container, but you can add them to the container and mix well. The bigger clumps will dissolve over time, so it's not a big deal. Let cool to room temperature, and package in a bottle. I like to use a spray bottle for my toners, but you could use any bottle you want.

If you have really dry skin, you can add a water soluble oil to this product to make something very moisturizing! I'm thinking adding 3% makes quite a bit of difference, so you'd add that to the heated water phase and take 3% out of the distilled water amount. And where's the panthenol I love so much? That would be awesome in a toner!

NOT SO SIMPLE TONER FOR DRY SKIN - ROSE WATER & CUCUMBER WITH PANTHENOL AND WATER SOLUBLE OILS
HEATED WATER PHASE
64% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
5% witch hazel
3% water soluble olive oil (PEG-7 olivate)
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin

COOL DOWN PHASE
2% liquid panthenol (if you have powdered, use it in the heated water phase)
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

Please follow the directions above.

What if you wanted to use something like hyaluronic acid in your toner? I've been using this more and more lately, although I can't say that it's working better for me than something like glycerin, I like how not sticky it is in comparison. What I do is make up a gel of 1% LMW hyaluronic acid* (from Lotioncrafter), 98.5% distilled water, and 0.5% liquid Germall Plus. Sprinkle the hyaluronic acid powder over the water, mix until it's all wet - meaning it's not white looking any more - and let sit for three hours. Return, mix a bit, then rejoice. Put it in a bottle and use it when you need to use hyaluronic acid in your products. (Original recipe for this gel at Lotioncrafter.) If you've used 1% in 99% water, you have a 1% gel. So if you add 10% of this gel to a toner, you'll have 0.1% hyaluronic acid in the gel, which is a good amount.

Let's see what the first recipe looks like with this hyaluronic acid in it. Remember when we add something to the product, we have to remove something from the distilled water phase. If you add 10% HA gel, remove 10% from the distilled water amount, leaving 50% distilled water.

NOT SO SIMPLE TONER FOR DRY SKIN - ROSE WATER & CUCUMBER SEA KELP, NIACINAMIDE, NAG, AND HYALURONIC ACID
HEATED WATER PHASE
50% distilled water
20% rose water or lavender hydrosol
10% hyaluronic acid gel (as made above)
5% witch hazel
3% sea kelp/bull kelp extract
2% niacinamide
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
2% one of glycerin, propylene glycol, or sodium lactate
0.5% allantoin

COOL DOWN PHASE
4% n-acetyl glucosamine
0.5% powdered cucumber extract
0.5% powdered chamomile extract
0.5% liquid Germall Plus

Please follow the directions as above.

Wowee! This toner packs a serious punch as it's filled with all kinds of film formers, hydrators, humectants, and more! (We'll revisit this recipe when we get to gels as this makes an amazing serum and under eye gel!)

You can modify the toners found in this post and this post to include these cosmeceuticals and more. There are so many cosmeceuticals, botanicals, extracts, and more that we can add to toners and facial cleansers. To go through them all would take years, so what I can offer you is this: You can add these cosmeceuticals to your toners quite easily by checking if they are water or oil soluble and learning how much of each ingredient to use. Remove the amount you're using from the distilled water amount, and enjoy!

Make small batches - 50 grams to 100 grams - the first time you add something, and keep great notes about how you like it. Add one ingredient at a time when you're trying something new so you can isolate the problem or the joy easily. Apart from some kind of immediate allergic response, you really have to give a new product at least seven days to see what impact it will have on your skin. If you get a pimple the next day, it's not from what you did the day before, it's what you did the week before. If you have some kind of stinging, burning, itching, and other adverse reaction, please stop using the ingredient immediately!

What ingredients are you interested in using in a toner? What ingredients do you have at home that you'd like to incorporate into something water soluble, like a toner or cleanser? Please share your thoughts in the comments below and we can figure out a few recipes for next week's final post on toners (for now). 

If you'd like to play along or if you've missed a post, here's a listing of the complete series...
Newbie Tuesday: We're making facial products! 
Shopping list
Equipment list
Let's start making facial cleansers! - Your skin type
Surfactants - what are they?
Meet the surfactants
pH of our surfactants
Facial products - the base recipe
Turning your cleanser into an exfoliating cleanser (part one) - physical exfoliants
Turning your cleanser into an exfoliating cleanser (part two) - physical exfoliants
Turning your cleanser into an exfoliating cleanser by adding chemical exfoliants
Modifying your facial cleanser into a foamer bottle recipe
Creating a facial toner (part one)
Creating a facial toner (part two)
Creating a facial toner (part three) - cosmeceuticals

Extra supply information as I used ingredients that weren't part of the original shopping trip in these recipes:


I offer the above links purely as information on where I buy my supplies. These are not affiliate links and I receive nothing if you purchase these ingredients from these stores. If you know of other shops that carry these ingredients, please feel free to share that information in the comments below with link, if possible. Please, no obvious advertising or spam! 

9 comments:

Kim said...

Love Love Love toners! This is where my formulating mind has been recently too, and armed with the info I've learned here, I formulated my own, very similar toner with the awesomeness of hyaluronic acid. I've been really enjoying this under my facial lotion for an added boost of moisture this winter. Thanks for the ideas for additional ingredients!

Belinda Karst said...

Oh, I need to make one of these today! My skin is dry and cranky in the winter and they all sound lovely!!

Susan said...

I am loving the toner! Where I wasn't much of a toner user before, I now use it morning and night ... my skin loves it! Looking forward to adding some cosmeceuticals, especially the HA to give my dry skin an extra boost! Thank you for the great information and recipes in this series!!
Susan

Slow Loris said...

Hi Susan. I'm curious as to how you chose the percentage amounts for Niacinamide and N-Acetyl Glucosamine? Everything I've read says the duo is most effective at levels that are the reverse of yours, i.e. Niacinamide at 4% and NAG at 2%. The nice thing about those percentages is that it's cheaper, as well. Here's one of the main studies I'm referring to: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17348991

Charlette said...

Thank you for this recipe. I made it this evening and in the heat phase one of powdered ingredients wasn't mixing well. Wasn't integrating well... Can the Allentoin be used in the Cooling Phase instead of the Heat Phase? Or perhaps it was the Niacinamide powder? I had to bring out the stick blender-and still wasn't perfectly blended. I'm doing something wrong!

Cuandollegoacasa said...

Hi Susan! Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge :) I'M SO HAPPY I FOUND THIS BLOG! I am going to try this and post here about my findings! Thank you

SweetHeartSearching said...

Thank you do much for those links at the bottom of the Posts! And sorry for adding a question to an email I sent before I read this one -lisa harman

Susan Barclay-Nichols said...

I'm so glad you're all enjoying toners so much! If you have specific recipes to share, I'd be so grateful to hear about them!

Hi Slow Loris! Sorry for the delay in writing this comment. It's been a crazy few weeks around here, and I'm just getting to my comments now!

I think this is the link from which I found that information. (I had a few other links, but they're dead now, and this was the only one I could find that works!)

Having said that, after doing a search and finding these links...

Proctor & Gamble
This one looks to be from them again, but there aren't any percentages given.
Medscape
PubMed again

...and a few more as well as one of my textbook - the Handbook of Cosmetic Science & Technology- you are completely right that 2% NAG and 4% niacinamide is reported as being effective, so I need to re-write my information to reflect that. Thank you so much for correcting me, and for providing me a great link so I could get started on re-evaluating what I've written!

Slow Loris said...

Thanks for the response, Susan! I just love your blog, it has been my trusty guide as I've delved into DIY beauty. I'm glad I could contribute.