Friday, June 16, 2017

Weekday Wonderings: How to use a solubilizer or Natrasorb Bath in a bath bomb?

I'm still working through all your comments and messages, so here are a few more...

In this post, Back to Basics: Bath bombs, Vintage Blue asked: I have to say after trying so many recipe I absolutely love yours. Now I'd hate to mess with perfection but I gotta ask. If I wanted to add poly to this to help disperse the oils a bit more how do it calculate for that? And then if I wanted to add powdered milk, how do I adjust for that?

Vintage Blue wrote again after I answered the previous question: When adding the Natrasorb am I calculating 3% of the powdered ingredients or 3% of the entire recipe?

Thank you very much for your kind words about the recipe. I really like it, but I must warn those of you who live in more arid climates that this recipe is designed for where I live in British Columbia as it's really humid here. If you find these won't stick together, try a few spritzes of alcohol or witch hazel to bind them without setting off the fizz.

I don't recommend using milk in products like this as they are unpreserved and can go off in a matter of days. (Believe me, I know this from personal experience, and it smells just awful!!!) As using polysorbate in this, you could substitute it for a titch of the oils - ideally, we use polysorbates at 1:1 at least - and use it that way. 

For instance, I use 13 grams of oil in my recipe, so I would add about 13 grams of polysorbate 80 (possibly more, it's a try and see what works kind of situation), 13 grams of PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, or more than 13 grams caprylyl/capryl glucoside (ECOcert, green solubilizer, but super sticky, so make a small batch to see what you think first). 

So my recipe would look like this...

BATH BOMBS WITH SOLUBILIZER
120 grams sodium bicarbonate
60 grams citric acid
13 grams carrier oil
13 grams solubilizer
4 grams fragrance oil
Titch of colour of some sort (I use LabColours liquid, a few drops)
Spritz of witch hazel or alcohol to bind it. 

Mix the powdered parts together very well and make sure there aren't any big hunks of baking soda or citric acid in the mix. Add your oil and fragrance oil and drip the colour into the oils. Mix really well - it might fizz a bit. This is normal. Press into the moulds very hard - pack a layer as hard as you can, then pack the next layer, until you've reached the top - and wait at least 45 minutes before removing. If you live in a high humidity area, wait longer.

I think I should have this recipe in percentages so it's easier to make changes, so let's do that now. 

I have a total of 210 grams in this recipe at the moment. Let's divide each ingredient by 210 to get our percentage...

120 grams sodium bicarbonate/210 grams = 57.1% sodium bicarbonate
60 grams citric acid/210 grams = 28.6% citric acid
13 grams carrier oil/210 grams = 6.2% carrier oil
13 grams solubilizer/210 grams = 6.2% carrier oil
4 grams fragrance oil/210 grams = 2% fragrance oil

So the new recipe looks like this when I round up or down

BATH BOMBS WITH SOLUBILIZER IN PERCENTAGES
57% sodium bicarbonate
29% citric acid
6% carrier oil of choice
6% solubilizer
2% fragrance oil
Titch of colour of some sort
Spritz of witch hazel or alcohol, if necessary


Or you could consider using something like Natrasorb Bath, and ingredient that absorbs oils and helps them disperse in water. I've written about this ingredient quite a few times, so doing a quick search will result in some of my experiments and favourite recipes! Let me know how it turns out!

Natrasorb Bath (INCI: Tapioca starch) isn't the kind of tapioca starch you can buy from a regular store. It's modified so it can hold a ton of oils - carrier oils and fragrance or essential oils - in a powdered state. It's hydrophilic - meaning it likes water - and it can absorb oils easily. When you're making something like bath salts or bath bombs, Natrasorb Bath will help fix the fragrance to make it last longer.

Do not confuse it with Natrasorb HFB (INCI Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate (and) Acrylates Copolymer (and) Magnesium Carbonate), which serves the same function. 

It's quite a fascinating process to see the way it absorbs oils! I measure out between 3% to 5% for my bath bombs and after adding up to 5% fragrance oil, it looks as if nothing had happened, except this really fluffy white powder now smells really great! I love to use it in my dry shampoo at 3% to 1% fragrance oil to make my hair smell nicer. You can use it up to 100% in any product. (Although at 100%, isn't it just a bag of Natrasorb?)

Let's say we're using the recipe above, how would we include the Natrasorb Bath? 

In this case, we are using it at 5% of the total recipe because that's what it calls for, so let's take out that solubilizer and replace it with Natrasorb Bath. We have 1% left over - we used 6% solubilizer, so there's 1% left over - so let's add that back to the sodium bicarbonate and have 58% of that now. 

BATH BOMBS WITH NATRASORB BATH IN PERCENTAGES
58% sodium bicarbonate
29% citric acid
6% carrier oil of choice
5% Natrasorb bath
2% fragrance oil
Titch of colour of some sort
Spritz of witch hazel or alcohol, if necessary

1. Mix the powdered parts together very well and make sure there aren't any big hunks of baking soda or citric acid in the mix. 

2. Into a separate container, add the oil, Natrasorb Bath, and fragrance oil and mix it well together. 

3. Add the Natrasorb powders into the bath bomb mixture, add your colour, then mix well until uniform. It might fizz a bit thanks to the liquid colour. This is normal. 

Press into the moulds very hard - pack a layer as hard as you can, then pack the next layer, until you've reached the top - and wait between 45 minutes for a small one (15 to 30 grams) up to overnight for larger ones. If you live in a high humidity area, wait longer.

As an aside, always make a sacrificial bath bomb, one that you can open or unmold to see if it works. The hope is that it makes it through the painful unmoulding process, but it's okay if it doesn't. If it ends up in pieces, make a fizzing bath salt from it! I generally use 100 grams of Epsom or fine sea salts with to every 50 grams of bath bomb I mess up, and it makes a lovely bath time treat! 

3 comments:

Aileen said...

Thank you Susan for suggesting the Natrasorb. I have a rather large bag of this and I'm going to try it in a bath bomb recipe. Just wondering by packing it so tightly, will this bomb float?

Lisa D. said...

Question. Could you add natrasorb to CP soap to help anchor a fragrance. Some people add clays to their soap to anchor EO's that fade quickly. Since I know you have branched out into making soap I thought you could answer this or at least find out for me.
Thanks!
Lisa D.

Vintage Blue said...

Thank you so much for this explanation. I will them tonight and see how it goes.